Manuscript Wishlist (MSWL)

Last updated: September 2019

Mission Statement:

I look for books that delight readers, that help inspire wonder and imagination, that foster deep empathy and compassion for our fellow human beings, that provide rich character representation of marginalized people groups, that take the reader on an adventure, that uncover fascinating stories from history’s footnotes, that explore issues of faith, that celebrate women and the female experience, that ask nitty gritty questions and don’t settle for easy answers, that make people disappointed when they have to close the book and go to bed, and books that add a touch of magic to readers’ lives. 

What I represent, in general:

  1. Picture books
  2. Middle Grade
  3. Young Adult
  4. Graphic Novels (MG/YA)
  5. Quirky gift books
  6. Books for both the general market, and the Christian market

In 2019—This year I’m particularly eager to sign more:

  1. Picture book author/illustrators. Some of my favorite illustrators include Juana Martinez-Neal, Vashti Harrison, the Fan Brothers, Emily Winfield Martin, David Litchfield, Anne Lambelet, and Sophie Blackall. I’m open to a wide range of illustration aesthetics and love having many different styles on my list. I look for a unique signature look.
  2. Graphic Novels. I’m looking for more MG and YA graphic novels. Some recent faves of mine: Pashmina, Making Friends, Pumpkinheads. I’d also love to work with someone who has a hybrid format similar to Brian Selznick’s works.
  3. YA Rom Com/Romance. Some favorites include Don’t Date Rosa Santos and When Dimple Met Rishi. I’m looking for a strong, commercial hook here.
  4. Mermaids. I want mermaid stories across the board! The catch here is that I’m not looking for the falls-in-love-with-a-human trope, the human-discovers she’s a mermaid trope, or an epic fantasy that features wars and kingdoms and sea politics. So I guess I want a… quiet mermaid novel? 

Visual MSWL—If you’d like to see a visual version of my manuscript wishlist, head over to my MSWL Pinterest board.

Client Books—If you’d like to see some of the books I’ve represented, head over to my Amazon list. (But don’t forget to support your local bookstore!)

PICTURE BOOKS:

  1. Contemporary Families—I love books that reflect real-life families and their real life experiences, particularly families and characters who haven’t been represented as much as white families have in picture books. Examples: Hair Love, My Papi Has a Motorcycle, Tell Me a Tattoo Story, Honeysmoke, Under My Hijab, Alma.
  2. Humor—I loved Maria the Matador, Dragons Love Tacos, The Bad Seed, Brunhilda’s Backwards Day, I Don’t Like Koala, Miss Hazeltime’s Home for Shy and Fearful Cats, and Even Superheroes Make Mistakes.
  3. Magical books—I love anything by The Fan Brothers, David Litchfield, and Emily Winfield Martin. A few favorite magical books: The Night Gardener, The Antlered Ship, Ocean Meets Sky, The Bear and the Piano, Remarkables, The Fantastic Flying Books of Morris Lessmore, Lola Shapes the Sky.
  4. Mermaids—Send me all of your mermaids!
  5. Karaoke—I’d love a joyful picture book about karaoke, sort of like the karaoke equivalent of Hip-Hop Lollipop.
  6. Spooky—I love spooky stories! Ghosts, haunted houses, cobwebs. If it was somehow possible for an author/illustrator to do a spooky-yet-entirely-kid-friendly picture book about rusalka, I would die of happiness. See How to Make Friends with a Ghost for my spooky book crush, as well as an upcoming picture book called The Ugly Doodles by my client Valeria Wicker.
  7. Family + Cultural Traditions—I love picture books about family traditions, especially when there is food, cooking, baking, or recipes involved. I’d also love to see other family traditions, like holiday traditions (loved The Night Tree and Mooncakes), house-cleansing or blessing ceremonies/traditions, etc. I also love books like Home and A World of Cookies for Santa which shows how people around the world do the same kind of thing in different ways.
  8. Stories that celebrate the ordinary magic of everyday life—Moments like capturing fireflies, making bread, watching a bird murmuration, the Northern Lights, planting a seed and having it grow into a living plant, and so on.
  9. Atmospheric—I love a unique atmosphere/strong sense of place in books across the board. Because picture books are fully illustrated, they create the unique opportunity to create a really visually dazzling atmosphere, and I’d love to have more atmospheric picture books on my list. I loved Hello, Lighthouse, for example.
  10. Blended Families—Foster family, adoption, or any sort of blended, non-traditional family structure. My husband and I plan to become foster parents and adoptive parents someday, so this is close to my heart!
  11. Cats—My cats Maple and Mulberry take it extremely personally that I’ve sold seven books about dogs but have yet to work on a single book about a cat, despite being completely obsessed with cats. Please, somebody, remedy this!
  12. Raccoons—I know, I know, raccoons are vicious and terrifying. But they’re also adorable! I’d love to have a raccoon picture book on my list. Preferably a funny one!
  13. Creativity—I am very much a creative, so I love picture books about art and creativity, like the iconic The Dot, and Ish. I also loved The Wonder and Beautiful Oops.
  14. Funny Christian picture books—I would love to see more funny Christian picture books in my inbox!
  15. Historical Footnotes—I love lesser known stories from history, like Finding Winnie.
  16. Girl power—Send me those girl power stories! The future is female. 🙂
  17. Bilingual books—I would love bilingual books, especially ones that incorporate Spanish.

MIDDLE GRADE:

  1. Own Voices—I love slice of life stories with a strong voice, like Front Desk.
  2. Magical Realism—This is my favorite genre in any age group, so I’d love to have more of it on my list.
  3. Graphic Novels—Some recent faves of mine were Pashmina and Making Friends. I’d also like to put out into the universe: I would die for the next Brian Selznick type of creator.
  4. Mermaids—I’m not looking for the girl-discovers-she’s-a-mermaid narrative here.
  5. Historical Fiction—I am a history nerd and love historical fiction that feels like it’s uncovering a fresh story.
  6. Mystery—I’m hungry for a good mystery! I will never forget reading The Dollhouse Murders when I was in fifth grade and having to close the book because I was so scared. I want to work on books that inspire that same level of book-induced fright!
  7. Epistolary Novel—I’d love an epistolary novel between two pen pals, or some sort of unique format.

YOUNG ADULT:

  1. Graphic Novels—I am really eager to acquire more YA graphic novels. A recent fave of mine is Pumpkinheads. I’d love to find something equally as atmospheric and fun!
  2. Mermaids—Like I said up above, I’m looking for something very specific here! I’d not looking for an epic fantasy, or a story in which someone discovers they’re a mermaid or a mermaid falls in love with a human. I want a quiet mermaid novel! And something that a non-genre reader could get into.
  3. Rom-Com—I’m dying for a rom-com with a high concept instant hook. I loved When Dimple Met Rishi and Don’t Date Rosa Santos.
  4. Thriller/Suspense/Mystery—I am a sucker for a good whodunit. I loved One of Us Is Lying, and am currently loving the Truly Devious series.
  5. Contemporary Realistic—I’m looking for a very voice-y YA writer who writes in the same vein of Robyn Schneider/John Green.
  6. Magical Realism—I’m looking for the next The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender.
  7. Atmospheric—I love books with a very atmospheric setting—boarding school, lighthouse, forest, things like that. Pull me into your world!
  8. Unique Form—I love stories that are told in unique formats like letters, emails, texts, etc. I loved Technically, You Started It.

ADULT BOOKS:

  1. Quirky Gift Books—I represented The Compendium of Magical Beasts, which is all about the anatomy of magical creatures, and would love to represent more gift books. I’m open to different topics and styles, but here are a few topics I’m specifically interested in: linguistics, science, historical footnotes. I’m also open to interactive journals with a great concept—would love to find the next Steal Like an Artist series.
  2. Concept-Driven Photography Books—I’d love to do a drone photography book, for example. I’d also love to do something with humor, like The Art of Clean Up.
  3. Lifestyle Books—I love books that toe the line between lifestyle, culture, and cookbook/craft book—like Scandinavian Gatherings, Fika: The Art of the Swedish Coffee Break, How to Hygge, The Year of Cozy, etc.
  4. Devotionals—I’d love to represent more concept-driven devotionals. I represented a knitting devotional called Knit, Pray, Share and loved the specificity of it. Would love to do more devotionals with unique hooks!

NOT QUITE MY CUP OF TEA:

  1. Memoirs
  2. Sports stories
  3. Erotica
  4. Space operas
  5. Amish Fiction
  6. Angel/Demon narratives
  7. Epic Fantasy
  8. Stories with a “dreamscape” element

First paragraph of a query letter

Let’s talk about the first paragraph of a query letter! In my mind this is the most important part to get right, and I want to share some thoughts on how to make it strong.

I look for the first paragraph of a query letter to include a birdseye view of the project—AKA the basic stats: title + reader category + genre + word count), as well as a quick logline. This grounds the agent in the project + shows that you know your stuff.

This looks like:

BIPPITY BOPPITY BOOP is a YA Romance at 80,000 words in which a young magician enters a televised magic competition only to find out that the competition is rigged to make the producer’s son win—and even worse, she’s falling in love with him.

The first paragraph is also the right place to mention any specifics on why you’re querying the agent in question—you were referred by one of their clients, you saw something specific on their MSWL, etc. Keep it professional though! Don’t be like, “I saw on your Instagram that 65 weeks ago you went to Ice Cream Social. I too love that place!” This doesn’t feel professional to me.

Now let’s talk more about what you ~shouldn’t~ do in the first paragraph. A common mistake I see is when writers use this precious real estate to list the themes or issues explored in their project. This feels vague and fluffy to me.

This looks like: “My novel is about love and fear and forgiveness and mental health issues and my protagonist overcomes many obstacles to accomplish her goal.” This doesn’t give me any sense for what actually happens in your book!

Other common querying mistakes: bashing other books in the same age group/genre as yours, word count too high/low, not including the basics, and when it doesn’t feel like a professional email.

Some of you have heard this similar advice dozens of times before, but we repeat it so often because so many writers forget to include the basics! They are crucial!

This has been First Paragraph of a Query Letter 101 with Adria Goetz. Remember to list your basics and nail down a succinct logline and you’ll be golden! Go get ‘em! You’ve got this!

The art of stress-baking

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When I go through busy, stressful seasons, I tend to bake a lot. “Stress-baking” was what one of my roommates in college called it. During final exams my kitchen sink would be full of bowls and spatulas and measuring cups, and the counters would be full of brownies and chocolate chip cookies and lemon lavender shortbread.

Recently, it’s been a busy time in both my professional and personal life, and whenever I get stressed or overwhelmed, I end up in my kitchen with my hair up in a messy bun, just like my younger self did.

Most recently I tried my hand at a classic Swedish cookie called drömmar. The literal English translation for drömmar is “dreams” and the cookie itself is most commonly referred to as the “Swedish Dream cookie.” The recipe calls for 1 teaspoon of baker’s ammonia (also called hornsalt or ammonium carbonate.) I had to special order it on Amazon, and when it came in the mail I opened it up and took a sniff and immediately started coughing. It smells terrible. Like high school chemistry class chemicals, or YMCA pool water.

While I mixed together the ingredients—butter and flour and sugar and vanilla and oil, and then added in the teaspoon of hornsalt, I thought, “There is no way these are not going to taste like YMCA pool water.” While they all baked together in the oven, the kitchen filled with the bitter fumes that made my eyes sting, and I again thought: “There is no way these are not going to taste like YMCA pool water.”

But after I pulled them out of the oven, and let them cool, I tried one and felt like my entire body melted into a pile of sugary buttery goo. They’re truly such little dreams come true. Like buttery pillows you want to rest your head on at night. The hornsalt is the crucial ingredient to get the right texture. And, for the record, they did not at all taste like YMCA pool water.

And you know I can’t help but think: this is exactly what writing is like. Right?

When you begin, you have the goal and intention to make something delicious. But as things get going, as you mix things together, things don’t smell like how you want them to. Doubt creeps in and you begin to think: “There is no way this is not going to read like whatever the literary version of YMCA pool water is.” But the beginning is always icky. In Bird by Bird, Anne Lamott calls this the “sh*tty first draft. ” But you can’t get to the dreamy final draft without it. And you have to hang in there during the sting and the stink and trust that the editorial process—and perhaps a critique group’s help—will bake out the yuck.

Because you can’t reach your dreams without a little bit of hornsalt.

__________________________________________________________________________

Drömmar Swedish Dream Cookies

(Recipe thanks to “Cultures of the World: Sweden” published by Cavendish Square in 2015)

1 stick unsalted butter, softened.

1 1.4 cups sugar

1 tsp. vanilla extract

1/3 cup vegetable oil

1 tsp. baker’s ammonia, also called hornsalt or powdered ammonium carbonate

1 2/3 cup all-purpose flour

Preheat oven to 300 degrees F. Line baking sheet with parchment paper.

In the bowl or mixer, beat together the butter, sugar and vanilla until light and fluffy. Slowly add the oil with the mixer on low speed. Add in the baker’s ammonia and flour and beat until combined. The dough will be on the drier side. Form 1-inch balls and place 2 inches apart on the baking sheet.

Bake for about 15-20 minutes, or until cookies have just begun to set. Let cookies cool on baking sheet for 5 minutes and then transfer cookies to a wire cooking rack and let cool completely.

Note from Adria: I’ve seen other recipes which include coconut, but I’m not one for coconut. I’ve also seen recipes call for almond extract rather than vanilla, which I’m going to try next time!

Meet Martin Literary’s newest agent

Please welcome Natalie Grazian, our newest agent, who recently relocated to Seattle from San Diego. Natalie is smart, witty, and lovely. She represents Adult Fiction projects, from commercial to literary, and has a special lean toward fiction with speculative elements. You can direct your queries to natalie@martinlit.com. You can read about her submission policies here. Her official website bio is below:

Natalie Grazian, Associate Literary Agent

As the latest on staff, Natalie is eager to build her adult fiction list. She is currently accepting queries for commercial, upmarket, and literary adult fiction.

Natalie has a BA in English and Minor in Spanish from Santa Clara University. Upon graduating, she worked as a sales representative for W. W. Norton & Co. and interned for two literary agencies, including Martin Literary & Media Management. For two years, Natalie was the Fiction Editor of The Santa Clara Review, the oldest literary magazine on the West Coast.

She’s thrilled to join MLM and fully realize her passion for working with authors and bringing their stories to life. She has a knack for collaborative manuscript development, extensive insight into the publishing world, and an irrepressible drive to see her clients’ work at the bookstore.

Natalie would love it if you sent her contemporary fantasy (in the vein of Lev Grossman’s The Magicians). She’s drawn to dark comedy that still carries a beating heart—because at the end of the day, she turns to books to find humanity. She is highly interested in reimagined myths and fairytales from different cultures, historical fiction, and a good quest narrative in any genre. More than anything, she looks for complex characters who make the unrelatable relatable, and for a smart, distinctive narrative voice. At this time, she’s not seeking military thrillers, sports stories, or romance novels. 

Natalie grew up in sunny San Diego, which she recalls wistfully from time to time, but not too often. She’s taken to Seattle like a duck to water. When she isn’t lost in a book, she might be writing stories or doing any number of bipedal activities in the mountainous Pacific Northwest. She is distrustful of any purse that can’t fit a slim paperback. Or two. Natalie tweets at @NatalieGrazian.

In Pursuit of Delight

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IN PURSUIT OF DELIGHT

My mission statement, which you can read at the top of my Manuscript Wish List post, specifies that I look for books that delight readers.

On my introductory phone calls with writers, I always read this mission statement so they can get a sense for who I am as a person, agent, and reader. And so they can see why I gravitated toward their work.

On a phone call with a writer recently, I mentioned that I found her work particularly delightful, and I thought readers would too. “Delightful projects are tough to find,” I explained.

Really?” she asked in disbelief.

Yes, really.

It seems that most of the picture book submissions that cross my desk are either too serious, or too didactic. They’re out to teach, inform, or carry out their agenda, and the story gets lost in the lesson. They lack delight. If you’re not sure what delight looks like, it looks like this: kids giggling, cackling at times, kids gasping, kids cheering as the story is being read aloud to them. Delight is NOT watered down commercialism-fueled projects with no substance, or a trend-chasing concept. It’s a story filled with twists and turns and all the good stuff.

I particularly love working with librarians and teachers, because I feel like they have their fingers on the pulse of what kids find delightful. They’re surrounded by kids so they can’t forget what it is that kids like. When they write, they’re not writing with a hypothetical child in mind. They’re writing with specific names and faces in mind. Real life wiggly kids with sticky hands who want to be delighted by stories, rather than scolded by them.

I’m hoping to spend the rest of my career in pursuit of delight.